Bibliography

LEADING MALAYSIAN NEOCON. (2018). Red Primer for Children and Diplomats: History of Communism in Cartoon Form. [online] Available at: https://scottthong.wordpress.com/2008/08/19/red-primer-for-children-and-diplomats-history-of-communism-in-cartoon-form-full-version-available/ [Accessed 13 Aug. 2018].

This website provides no background to the image, aside from the year of publishing, and as such is only valuable in the sense it contains the actual image. Its weaknesses are that we can not be certain who the target audience is, nor what background the author came from to inspire him to create such a source.

Phillips, S., Collier, M. and Lewis, E. (2001). The Cold War: Conflict in Europe and Asia. Oxford, Chicago: Heinemann.

This book is extremely valuable and provides a wide variety of information, with the source used simply an excerpt from a much larger passage on the Berlin Wall. The intention of the author is outlined, as is the place of origin of the source. Moreso the target audience being students is clearly articulated, as is the book’s association with the Heinemann Series, adding credibility to its content.

Schuler, C. (2018). History of the Berlin Wall through maps. [online] 360.here.com. Available at: https://360.here.com/2014/11/06/fall-wall-missing-pieces/ [Accessed 13 Aug. 2018].

This website provides only limited information about the two sources, such as the year and by which country they were produced. It doesn’t give information on the authors themselves, or the specific audience they were aimed at (Government officials, the general public, other nations, etc.), but the general information provided still makes this resource quite valuable.

Walsh, B. (1996). GCSE Modern World History. London: John Murray.

This book is very valuable in that it provides information about its author, its country of origin and its target audience. It clearly states its links to GCSE, establishing its credibility.

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